Monthly Archives: September 2012


Nate Reed: Who will free the captives?

Posted by in Faith | September 24, 2012

If I could pick just one situation from my list of many that I have learned from in my life, I would pick the last time I was in jail. I had been running from God for awhile up to this point; but because he is who he is, he kept pursuing me. Never giving up, he showed his face to me while in that dark place.

The thing I realized was that God had to strip everything away from me so that he could show me who was really in charge. I really had no control over my life at that point. I would just go along with what everyone else was doing even if I didn’t agree with it, just so that I could fit in. That obviously didn’t work out very well. By the time i was 20 I had been arrested 5 times and really had nothing of significance to show for my life. I had ruined my relationship with my family and friends, and wanted nothing to do with God. I didn’t feel that i deserved his grace.

But as it turns out, that was a lie that the devil was using to try and keep me from having a relationship with God. After that realization, I sat in a jail cell for a couple of days before I could finally go to a church service. The most significant thing about that service was that I was able to get my hands on a bible, which I was able to take back to my cell with me. At that point, I felt like this was something that was just between me and Christ. I didn’t feel like I had to live up to any certain “standard.” (And if you have been around enough christians you know exactly what I’m talking about).

I felt a sense of freedom, which is funny now, because my body was not free. I was being told when to wake up, when I could shower, and when I could eat; but for the first time, my soul felt a sense of freedom I had never felt in my life.

Nate Reed

Trey Reed: A Father to the Fatherless

Posted by in Faith | September 17, 2012

Today I reflected on not having a father my entire life.  This train of thought was partially false and partially true. The part that is true is that my father, John Dewey Reed II was taken from this Earth on May 9, 1991 and i was born May 27, 1991. All I ever knew of my father were stories that I treasure to this day more than anything else in this world. So literally, the man I am named after, resemble and come from, was never there for me by no choice of his own (though if it was his choice, I know he would be sitting next to me, swapping stories and that my life would be very different).

The false part of my train of thought earlier today was that I did have a surrogate father. As cliche as this may sound, God has been my father my entire life. When a man marries a woman and starts a family, his number one priority is to provide for and care for that family. His number one priority is to work as hard as he can to make a better life for those he loves. In my father’s absence, God has done this. My heavenly father has provided for me and my mother in some of the toughest of times. Even when it seemed like we were going to sink, God was working behind the scenes to keep us afloat. Amazingly enough, God directly and indirectly molded me into the man I am today.

Growing up without a father had its many gloomy moments, and when I look at the statistics, I see that I had the odds stacked against. I was 9 times more likely to drop out of high school than normal boys that didn’t come from broken homes; 32 times more likely to end up homeless, on the streets; 10 times more likely to end up addicted to a chemical substance and 20 times more likely to end up in prison…

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Marcus Grimaldi: fix our gaze on things that cannot be seen

Posted by in Brotherhood,Faith | September 10, 2012

I had a really close friend, Logan Chesnut, who was diagnosed with Leukemia about 2 years ago. Every week, I would talk to him about God and what Jesus did for all of us.  At first he didn’t think that Christ was the only way to heaven, but being a good person was.  He believed there was a God and that he created everything, but he didn’t really understand, or live for Him. 

Over a period over a year, his Leukemia went away and he was almost home free, but I still continued to talk to him and ask where he stood in his faith with Christ.  He was never too sure and could never really give me a straight answer.  A few weeks later, his leukemia came back and was worse this time.  He dropped from 165 pounds to 106 pounds and was basically withering away.  I still continued to talk to him about what it meant to be a follower of Christ and how to do so.

He told me that the reason he stayed friends with me for so long compared to anyone else was how I carried myself.  I didn’t cuss, drink, I was polite to everybody, and I cared about how he was doing, visiting him multiple times a week in the hospital.

One night I was compelled to call him one more time and talk to him about Christ.  I asked him where he stood on his faith and he replied to me that He had accepted Christ into his heart and was baptized in his home (unable to go into public because of his leukemia). I literally broke down crying I was so relieved by his decision.  

The next week I was planning on visiting him at his house before I went back to school. I was so hectic in packing, that it completely slipped my mind to visit him one last time.  I arrived at school and that very night I received a phone call that he passed away..

I was so distraught that I didn’t see him one last time, but remembered that he accepted Christ into his life and was in a better place, with no more pain. And the best part was that I knew that I would see him forever!  I have been at peace since that time, knowing that he accepted Christ into his life, and that I had a little part in helping him get there!

Ever since he got sick, I shared with him one of my favorite verses in the Bible, which was announced as his inspirational quote at his funeral, dedicated to me.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18- 

“That is why we never give up. Though our bodies are dying, our spirits are being renewed every day. For our present troubles are small and won’t last very long. Yet they produce for us a glory that vastly outweighs them and will last forever! So we don’t look at the troubles we can see now; rather, we fix our gaze on things that cannot be seen. For the things we see now will soon be gone, but the things we cannot see will last forever.”

– Marcus Grimaldi